You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Most extreme temperatures in the history of every state

Stacker Logo By Anuradha Varanasi of Stacker | Slide 1 of 51: While the United States is the third-largest country in the world, it's far from surprising that the weather varies significantly in each region. As some states are infamous for having blistering hot summers, several others become inundated by winter storms.

More than 210 degrees Fahrenheit separates the highest and the lowest temperatures on record in the United States. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported that the summer of 2019 was the second hottest in a 140-year record in the Northern Hemisphere. At 1.67 degrees Fahrenheit above the average temperature during the 20th century, the heat was so intense it shrunk the Arctic sea ice coverage by 30%.

The heat persisted until October in the U.S., with some parts of Alabama reaching an all-time high of 99 degrees and Baltimore at 98 degrees. Yet, comprehensive data is still not available on how the summer 2019 heatwave broke records.

Before these aggressive heatwaves stifled 131 million Americans, the 2019 polar vortex left people shivering in the bitter cold during January across the Midwest and East Coast. The cold resulted in 50 frostbite victims in Chicago itself.

Stacker consulted 2019 data from the NOAA's State Climate Extremes Committee (SCEC) to create this slideshow illustrating the hottest and coldest temperatures ever recorded in each state. Each slide also reveals the all-time highest 24-hour precipitation record and all-time highest 24-hour snowfall.

Read on to find out individual state records in alphabetical order. Get ready to learn where the temperature hit 134 degrees—the highest ever recorded in the U.S.—and which two states hold the distinct honor as the locations having the coldest temperatures at -80 degrees and -70 degrees.

You may also like: Natural disasters linked to climate change

Most extreme temperatures in the history of every state

While the United States is the third-largest country in the world, it's far from surprising that the weather varies significantly in each region. As some states are infamous for having blistering hot summers, several others become inundated by winter storms.

More than 210 degrees Fahrenheit separates the highest and the lowest temperatures on record in the United States. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported that the summer of 2019 was the second hottest in a 140-year record in the Northern Hemisphere. At 1.67 degrees Fahrenheit above the average temperature during the 20th century, the heat was so intense it shrunk the Arctic sea ice coverage by 30%.

The heat persisted until October in the U.S., with some parts of Alabama reaching an all-time high of 99 degrees and Baltimore at 98 degrees. Yet, comprehensive data is still not available on how the summer 2019 heatwave broke records.

Before these aggressive heatwaves stifled 131 million Americans, the 2019 polar vortex left people shivering in the bitter cold during January across the Midwest and East Coast. The cold resulted in 50 frostbite victims in Chicago itself.

Stacker consulted 2019 data from the NOAA's State Climate Extremes Committee (SCEC) to create this slideshow illustrating the hottest and coldest temperatures ever recorded in each state. Each slide also reveals the all-time highest 24-hour precipitation record and all-time highest 24-hour snowfall.

Read on to find out individual state records in alphabetical order. Get ready to learn where the temperature hit 134 degrees—the highest ever recorded in the U.S.—and which two states hold the distinct honor as the locations having the coldest temperatures at -80 degrees and -70 degrees.

You may also like: Natural disasters linked to climate change

© Unsplash

More from Stacker

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon