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Old Farmer’s Almanac Says A Cold, Dry Winter Is Ahead In IL

Patch logo Patch 9/1/2021 Andrea Earnest
“This coming winter could well be one of the longest and coldest that we’ve seen in years,” Janice Stillman, editor of The Old Farmer’s Almanac, said in a news release. © Shutterstock “This coming winter could well be one of the longest and coldest that we’ve seen in years,” Janice Stillman, editor of The Old Farmer’s Almanac, said in a news release.

ILLINOIS — The Old Farmer’s Almanac says a “season of shivers” with brutally cold temperatures and lots of snow awaits much of the United States this winter. In Illinois, "bone-chilling, below-average" temperatures are possible, according to The Old Farmer's Almanac.

“This coming winter could well be one of the longest and coldest that we’ve seen in years,” Janice Stillman, editor of The Old Farmer’s Almanac, said in a news release.

In Illinois, which is mostly part of the "Lower Lakes" region, the coldest temperatures are expected in mid to late November, through most of December and January and in early to mid-February, according to The Old Farmer's Almanac. Snowfall will be near normal for most of the area.

Across America:

  • The Pacific Coast and parts of the Southwest will be spared the frigid cold, but also will remain relatively dry.
  • Temperatures are expected to be near normal, but abundant snowfall and frequent storms are forecast from eastern Montana southward through the western halves of the Dakotas and northeastern Colorado.
  • Cold, relatively dry weather is forecast for the Upper Midwest, except for an area around Lake Michigan that could see heavy snowfall.
  • A combination of super-cold temperatures and heavy snowfall is expected in areas from New England to the Ohio Valley to northern portions of the Deep South and southeast New Mexico.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac is published by Yankee Publishing Inc., an employee-owned company based in Dublin, New Hampshire. The publication has been making weather forecasts for 230 years and claims an 80 percent accuracy rate.

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