You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Phoenix ties record-high temperature; heat warning remains

Arizona Republic logo Arizona Republic 6/13/2019 Claire Rafford
UP NEXT
UP NEXT

After a pleasant May temperature-wise, the Phoenix area now is dealing with a bout of intense heat, which has resulted in an excessive-heat warning that will continue for another day.

“Anyone who goes outside will notice an intense heat,” said Andrew Deemer, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Phoenix.

Phoenix’s temperature Wednesday tied the record of 112 degrees — a mark last reached June 12, 1974.

Monday and Tuesday saw highs of 109 and 108 degrees, respectively, in Phoenix.

A heat advisory, originally issued Monday, is scheduled to continue through 8 p.m. Thursday, meaning temperatures could again exceed 110 degrees. According to the National Weather Service, Phoenix on Thursday will experience “a high near 112.” 

a view of a city at sunset: Arizona sunsets heating up with hot summer days. © Courtesy of Joann Zimmerman Arizona sunsets heating up with hot summer days.

For more stories that matter, subscribe to azcentral.com.

“Just like today, tomorrow’s going to be really hot,” Deemer said.

He said that to avoid the dangerous heat conditions, people should be prepared — including making sure they have somewhere to go should their air-conditioning break down, making sure their pets are safe in the heat and having water in case a car gets a flat tire, to name a few precautions.

“The truth is, heat kills,” Deemer said.

He said this unusually high heat wave is caused by high pressure building over the Southwest that will continue “for most of the summer.”

This year, the pressure just happened to build earlier, after an unusually mild May, he said.

Deemer said temperatures are expected to cool down Friday — the National Weather Service is forecasting a high of 104 — which is more typical for this time of year in Arizona.

While residents are encouraged to stay hydrated and avoid prolonged periods of time outdoors, such as hiking, Deemer said one of the most important things to do is to make sure that community members are staying safe.

“Check in on family, neighbors, friends … just check in on people,” he said.

This article originally appeared on Arizona Republic: Phoenix ties record-high temperature; heat warning remains

AdChoices
AdChoices

More from Arizona Republic

Arizona Republic
Arizona Republic
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon