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States with the wettest summers

Stacker Logo By Betsy Ladyzhets of Stacker | Slide 1 of 50: Although the official first day of summer isn’t until June 21st, temperatures are starting to rise around the country. Already, Washington, D.C. faced a heat wave this past May, and a high school in DeSoto, Texas had to delay its graduation ceremony by an hour in order to beat the sun. Warm weather isn’t the only hallmark of summer, though. Many parts of the U.S. also face their rainiest months in June, July, and August. Whether it’s days of rainfall hindering a construction project or a sudden afternoon thunderstorm putting a damper on picnic plans, the chill and intensity of summer precipitation can be even more debilitating than the heat. But where in America is this rainfall the most intense?In order to answer this question, Stacker turned to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s climatological rankings. The NOAA has recorded precipitation at national, regional, and state levels on a monthly basis since January, 1895, and calculated averages and records. We examined each state in the time period of June to September, and pulled the average summer precipitation over the entire twentieth century, last year’s precipitation, and the wettest and driest summers on record. We also included each state’s record for the most precipitation in 24 hours, from the NOAA’s State Climate Extremes. This data unfortunately does not include Hawaii.Read on to find out how much rain to expect in your state this summer, and how recent years have stacked up compared to the wettest and driest summers recorded in that state.

States with the wettest summers

Although the official first day of summer isn’t until June 21st, temperatures are starting to rise around the country. Already, Washington, D.C. faced a heat wave this past May, and a high school in DeSoto, Texas had to delay its graduation ceremony by an hour in order to beat the sun. Warm weather isn’t the only hallmark of summer, though. Many parts of the U.S. also face their rainiest months in June, July, and August. Whether it’s days of rainfall hindering a construction project or a sudden afternoon thunderstorm putting a damper on picnic plans, the chill and intensity of summer precipitation can be even more debilitating than the heat. But where in America is this rainfall the most intense?

In order to answer this question, Stacker turned to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s climatological rankings. The NOAA has recorded precipitation at national, regional, and state levels on a monthly basis since January, 1895, and calculated averages and records. We examined each state in the time period of June to September, and pulled the average summer precipitation over the entire twentieth century, last year’s precipitation, and the wettest and driest summers on record. We also included each state’s record for the most precipitation in 24 hours, from the NOAA’s State Climate Extremes. This data unfortunately does not include Hawaii.

Read on to find out how much rain to expect in your state this summer, and how recent years have stacked up compared to the wettest and driest summers recorded in that state.

© Georgii Shipin // Shutterstock

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