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What monkeypox looks like compared to 7 skin conditions including acne, herpes, and syphilis

By cschusterbruce@businessinsider.com (Dr. Catherine Schuster-Bruce) of INSIDER | Slide 1 of 9:  Monkeypox causes a rash that can look similar to other illnesses such as acne, herpes or syphilis. Two dermatologists told Insider the key differences between monkeypox and seven other rashes. Monkeypox spreads through close contact with an infected person or from touching contaminated items. Monkeypox can cause a rash that looks similar to other illnesses, including herpes or syphilis  — but there are some key differences, dermatologists told Insider. Alongside a fever, a rash is one of the main symptoms of monkeypox. A recent study found that of 528 monkeypox cases diagnosed in 16 countries between April and June of this year, 95% had a rash, Insider previously reported.Monkeypox has spread rapidly in recent months. More than 21,000 people across 79 countries have caught it in an unusual outbreak that began in May outside of regions where it is typically found, data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows. In the US, there were 4,907 confirmed cases as of Thursday, mostly in New York.A high number of cases have been diagnosed in gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men, according to the CDC, but it is not a "gay disease." Anyone can catch it from having close contact with an infected person or touching contaminated items such as bedding.Pregnant people, kids under 8 years old, those with eczema, and people with weakened immune systems may be at risk of severe monkeypox. Don't try to diagnose new rashes at home, doctors saidDr. Carrie Kovarik, a professor of dermatology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, told Insider, "We don't expect patients to diagnose themselves, but I think having monkeypox on their radar at least is good, especially for patients who may be at risk for more severe disease." Other diseases can cause similar rashes, and it's possible to be co-infected with monkeypox and another infection."My message is these skin conditions are not things that you should be trying to diagnose or manage yourself at home," Dr. Esther Freeman, director of Global Health Dermatology at Massachusetts General Hospital, said.Read the original article on Insider

What monkeypox looks like compared to 7 skin conditions including acne, herpes, and syphilis

  • Monkeypox causes a rash that can look similar to other illnesses such as acne, herpes or syphilis.
  • Two dermatologists told Insider the key differences between monkeypox and seven other rashes.
  • Monkeypox spreads through close contact with an infected person or from touching contaminated items.

Monkeypox can cause a rash that looks similar to other illnesses, including herpes or syphilis  — but there are some key differences, dermatologists told Insider. 

Alongside a fever, a rash is one of the main symptoms of monkeypox. A recent study found that of 528 monkeypox cases diagnosed in 16 countries between April and June of this year, 95% had a rash, Insider previously reported.

Monkeypox has spread rapidly in recent months. More than 21,000 people across 79 countries have caught it in an unusual outbreak that began in May outside of regions where it is typically found, data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows. In the US, there were 4,907 confirmed cases as of Thursday, mostly in New York.

A high number of cases have been diagnosed in gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men, according to the CDC, but it is not a "gay disease." Anyone can catch it from having close contact with an infected person or touching contaminated items such as bedding.

Pregnant people, kids under 8 years old, those with eczema, and people with weakened immune systems may be at risk of severe monkeypox

Don't try to diagnose new rashes at home, doctors said

Dr. Carrie Kovarik, a professor of dermatology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, told Insider, "We don't expect patients to diagnose themselves, but I think having monkeypox on their radar at least is good, especially for patients who may be at risk for more severe disease." 

Other diseases can cause similar rashes, and it's possible to be co-infected with monkeypox and another infection.

"My message is these skin conditions are not things that you should be trying to diagnose or manage yourself at home," Dr. Esther Freeman, director of Global Health Dermatology at Massachusetts General Hospital, said.

Read the original article on Insider
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